Mary House

Mary House has been involved with horses for most of her life. Having competed in

dressage and preliminary eventing, her interests have turned to natural therapies and horsemanship. These include the modalities featured on this website as well as Bach Flower Essences and Barefoot Trimming.

The first South Australian to be qualified by the Victorian National College of Traditional Medicine and the SA representative of the Australian Myofunctional Therapy Association, Mary is also the first South Australian to gain certification in the courses run by American pioneer of Equine CranioSacral Therapy, Maureen Rogers.

Her training as an NCAS Level 2 Coach and Assessor with Riding for the Disabled, has helped her to understand the importance of a well-balanced, willing, happy, calm horse, whatever discipline the horse is following.
   

Mary started riding at the age of 5 at the local riding school in England.  She continued though out her schooling with lessons and finally owned her own horse as a teenager.  In her early twenties she moved to Australia and horses once again became part of her life.  In 1988 she purchased a Connemara Pony, and that began a  life lasting commitment to the welfare of the horse and pony. She now has four equine friends on her property in the Adelaide Hills.

 

Around 1990 she began to teach for Riding for the Disabled and qualified as a level 2 coach in 1995. She taught at Kersbrook Equestrian Centre for about 8 years, during which time she also considered becoming a coach with the EFA.  Not happy with this conforming method of teaching she became interested and began following the Natural Horsemanship movement. As a result she has taken four horses through the basic Parelli Natural Horsmanship levels and currently studies with Steve Halfpenny of Blanchetown. 

 

In 2001 she qualified as an Equine Masseur and energy healer. The following year she learnt to barefoot trim and now combines the health and welfare of the horse with her teaching.

 

All horses benefit from her soft approach, and when the riders are relaxed and happy, sitting in a balanced seat, the horses will reflect that in their movements.